Amboseli holiday highlights

Amboseli is home to a large number of wildlife, particularly during the dry season when watering holes are few and far between. There are around a thousand elephants that live in the park or migrate through it, following a path set down by their ancestors many years before. This is one of the last places on the continent to see the ‘big tuskers’, so called because of their incredible tusks that are so long that they almost skim the ground. Huge herds can be seen wherever you look, either feeding in the swamps or crossing the park in a carefully curated order, crossing tracks and enforcing the unwritten rule of ‘elephants always have right of way’. This is the sort of traffic jam you’ll be more than happy to be caught up in.

It may be hard to believe it but Amboseli isn’t all about the ellies. Buffalo, Grant’s zebra, wildebeest and antelope roam the plains, stalked by big cats, and opportunistic wild dogs and hyenas are never too far away. And then there are the bird species. Egrets stick with the elephants like faithful servants, some riding on their backs and others picking at the ground disturbed by hundreds of plate-sized feet; a flock of ostriches sprint across the plains; secretary birds, seemingly dressed for a day in the office, search the grasslands for snakes; and grey crowned cranes forage in the park’s marshes. You may find yourself stopping more to tick off another type of bird than to watch one of Amboseli’s many mammals.

Where is Amboseli?
Amboseli National Park is located in the Rift Valley in southern Kenya, close to the border with Tanzania. It’s around four hours south-east of Nairobi by road or one hour by air. The 15,000-acre Selenkay Conservancy, where we feature a [bush camp](Amboseli is home to a large number of wildlife, particularly during the dry season when watering holes are few and far between. There are around a thousand elephants that live in the park or migrate through it, following a path set down by their ancestors many years before. This is one of the last places on the continent to see the ‘big tuskers’, so called because of their incredible tusks that are so long that they almost skim the ground. Huge herds can be seen wherever you look, either feeding in the swamps or crossing the park in a carefully curated order, crossing tracks and enforcing the unwritten rule of ‘elephants always have right of way’. This is the sort of traffic jam you’ll be more than happy to be caught up in. It may be hard to believe it but Amboseli isn’t all about the ellies. Buffalo, Grant’s zebra, wildebeest and antelope roam the plains, stalked by big cats, and opportunistic wild dogs and hyenas are never too far away. And then there are the bird species. Egrets stick with the elephants like faithful servants, some riding on their backs and others picking at the ground disturbed by hundreds of plate-sized feet; a flock of ostriches sprint across the plains; secretary birds, seemingly dressed for a day in the office, search the grasslands for snakes; and grey crowned cranes forage in the park’s marshes. You may find yourself stopping more to tick off another type of bird than to watch one of Amboseli’s many mammals. Where is Amboseli? Amboseli National Park is located in the Rift Valley in southern Kenya, close to the border with Tanzania. It’s around four hours south-east of Nairobi by road or one hour by air. The 15,000-acre Selenkay Conservancy, where we feature a bush camp, is located to the north of the national park boundary. When to visit Amboseli can be visited at any time and its lodges are open year round. The most popular time to visit –when wildlife viewing opportunities are at their best – is during the dry months from June to October and in January and February. The park can get particularly busy from July to September as those who visit the Maasai Mara to experience the Great Wildebeest Migration often add a few days in Amboseli to see the famed elephants and mountain vistas. In October, which usually marks the end of the dry season, there are just a few watering holes left and the concentration of animals around these water sources is quite high. The short rains usually arrive in November and last for a couple of months and the long rains begin in April and may last until mid-June. During this time, you should be able to get a great value deal at camps and lodges, but it’s worth weighing up the fact that game drives may be affected by bad road conditions and floods. Birders will love visiting in this off season as there are many migratory birds in the park which have flown south to escape the Northern Hemisphere’s winter. "bush camp"), is located to the north of the national park boundary.

When to visit
Amboseli can be visited at any time and its lodges are open year round. The most popular time to visit –when wildlife viewing opportunities are at their best – is during the dry months from June to October and in January and February. The park can get particularly busy from July to September as those who visit the Maasai Mara to experience the Great Wildebeest Migration often add a few days in Amboseli to see the famed elephants and mountain vistas. In October, which usually marks the end of the dry season, there are just a few watering holes left and the concentration of animals around these water sources is quite high. The short rains usually arrive in November and last for a couple of months and the long rains begin in April and may last until mid-June. During this time, you should be able to get a great value deal at camps and lodges, but it’s worth weighing up the fact that game drives may be affected by bad road conditions and floods. Birders will love visiting in this off season as there are many migratory birds in the park which have flown south to escape the Northern Hemisphere’s winter.